Category: i’m allergic

Day Fifty-Four

There really should have been a two-hour delay this morning because there was a lot of snow. Every district north of us (and I mean all the way to Canada) and most of the ones south of us delayed or closed, and the roads were absolutely awful, but for some reason The Superintendent didn’t call it. Sooooo we had a half dozen students (that I know of) and two buses get into accidents- none really serious, thankfully- and basically all of us were late to school. 

I arrived about fifteen minutes after the first bell. I was a bit discombobulated, of course, but I settled in and still had plenty of time to mark up current events for revision. And that’s what students did during the World/English double block: they revised and submitted a polished portfolio. If they finished early, they could use the time to read, or begin outlining their book papers with Mrs. T. 

While she was going over outlines, I was watching the room, fielding questions, and doing my best to rein in some bad behavior (the health classes are doing the unit on sex ed. now, and some of the boys were flicking the condoms they’d gotten at each other). We switched roles about half an hour in so I could work one-on-one with a student who was refusing to do anything, and then with one who needed lots of help and was getting anxious about it. If we didn’t team teach, that couldn’t have happened, so- as ever- I’m glad that we do!

I had a headache by the time it was over, which could’ve been from the stress of keeping those challenging students I was working with calm and on task, or could’ve been from the amount of Axe the boys were wearing today. It seemed more than usual, and I’m wicked allergic to it.

The headache made it so the two meetings- team, then faculty- in my afternoon seemed oddly long. But I made it through both of them. I had grading to do afterwards, but no Tylenol in my desk, so took papers home, which I rarely do. 

Now it’s time to grade them…

Day Thirty-Five

I started my day with a lecture on interest groups and lobbying (with a tangent on PACs and stuff because someone asked about that), then assigned a group project on interest groups and iron triangles. I had lots of little discussions while students did research: communism, chambers of commerce, the Flying Spaghetti Monster, the establishment clause, gun control, Reagan… 

It’s good stuff. 

Fed. 10 will come back to haunt them shortly. Mwahahaha.

image

Ahem.

Life in the Cavern of Learning was good, too. Mrs. T worked with anyone whose narrative wasn’t done. I moved everyone else on to the new unit- Africa- and to labeling maps, doing some cultural research, and reading books. There was a medical emergency in the building (I have no idea what happened, but the kids had tons of rumors), and a resulting lockdown right before Block 2 ended. That caused minor chaos- lots of questions, kids trying to look out the window at the ambulance, etc…- and basically ate up flex time.

In spite of that, it was a super productive double block, and a great example of the “move when ready” approach to learning that The Principal wants more of. We also got observed by an elementary school teacher after lunch, and she thought it was neat. Go us.

image

Now, the other day, a bottle of Axe exploded in boy’s backpack, which was wicked bad for me because I have a fragrance allergy. We figured he’d wash the backpack, but nope. I did my best to stay away, but it wasn’t enough. By Block 5 my nose was stuffy and my eyes were itchy. I had an APUSGOV student in to retake a test, so I just had to sit and resist the urge to sniffle and CLAW MY EYES OUT OMG. 

I managed, though!

Day Thirty-One

I felt a bit out of sorts today. 

Our juniors were all taking PSATs, so the bell schedule was off, which meant my timing was off. And I am still getting over a cold, and my allergies were haywire. My allergies made my eyes so watery that I could hardly see during APUSGOV, which, of course, my students thought was funny. But I managed.

I did a lesson on media bias and selective exposure, and fake news. It’s a cool lesson, and it went well enough, but- aside from the moment when my students realized I know what 4chan is- it didn’t pop. I was hoping for a more animated discussion, I think. Must do better next time…

World/English was great. Mrs. T started class with some quick grammar lessons (pronoun usage, formatting dialogue) and then we divided students up to work on their narratives. Everyone without a finished rough draft went to her side of the Cavern, and spread out to keep from getting distracted while writing. Everyone with a finished draft grouped up with 2-3 others on my side for peer conferencing. Mrs. T an I did conferences, too. It was definitely a productive day.

And! During Block 5, a student who’s been behind on his work came by to turn the bulk of it in, which was awesome. I was so proud of him, and said as much.

Day One Hundred Forty-Eight

Today was hot, humid, and full of pollen, so my allergies were terrible. They make my eyes all red and itchy, and it’s hard to see, and just… not a good look. This was confirmed when I walked into PLC and Mr. I asked if I’d had a late night. 

He made up for it later by pointing out that I love my job and take it seriously.

It’s… reassuring isn’t quite the right word, but close… to hear someone else say that, you know? Because later on in the morning, as class was starting, I was feeling out of sorts, and stressed for no particular reason, and I reminded myself that he’d said that. It made me feel better. 

And then I was treated to an APUSGOV presentation about domestic policy with parodies of “No Diggity” and “I Want It That Way,” and all was right in the world. Presentations (the other two were more traditional) took up the bulk of the block, so I had just enough time to chat about what’s next (AP exam practice!) 

Then research took up the bulk of World. My students were not as enthusiastic about it as their peers were yesterday, but they still got good work done. It’s interesting to see which topics are popular in different classes. Like, yesterday, a lot of kids were looking into LGBT rights and womens rights in various parts of Asia. Today, lots of kids were looking into the dictatorship in North Korea, child labor and poaching. 

Practice was all about 4×1 hand-offs for me and eight sprinters. I made minor adjustments for the boys, and major ones for the girls- including putting a new girl at third leg, and moving the one who had been there to anchor. It took A LOT of trial and error to get passes down, but I think we did it.