Author: Adventures of a Third Year Teacher

Regular

That director just won the Emmy’s.

So happy for them!

Regular

My grandma passed away last week and today was the funeral. It was a beautiful service, and exactly what my grandma wanted.

But when I go? Just cremate me and throw a party.

How do you stay on top of grading homework? 8t…

How do you stay on top of grading homework? 8th grade science teacher whimpering at the sight of her pile of homework.

Hello @lovely-anomaly. I know a lot of different teachers have a lot of different answers for this, and my answers may have “ed-reformers” and “Twitter teachers” in a tizzy. 

1.) If a Google Form + Flubaroo can grade an assessment, it should. Science doesn’t always lend itself to multiple choice formative assessment, but sometimes you just need to asses students on facts before you start application or analysis. You can also give a multiple choice homework assignment and have kids key-in their answers on a Google Form the next day. Google Form grades it, emails them their grade, you copy/paste the results into gradebook.

2.) Whenever possible, have students grade each other’s work, or more often than not, grade themselves. When turning in essays, I have students highlight their claim, evidence, warrant, and rebuttal. That makes grading the essays a lot easier because I see exactly where students placed their information and it jumps off of the page. Giving students a voice in HOW they are being assessed can make your job easier. 

3.) On that note, focus your grading. I do not know what science looks like, but for ELA classrooms, grading stacks on stacks on stacks of essays is incredibly daunting. I focus my grading on the specific standards that I’m assessing at the time. I have kids highlight and circle where they attempted whatever standard we’re working on. This means that, YES, the entire essay can be misspelled and a total mess, but if they achieved that one standard, they can do well. Rubrics go a long way to help out as well. Some teachers HATE that and prefer to be prescriptive over helpful; that’s your call.   

4.) Something rarely told to to teachers, but cue the collecting pearl-clutching: you don’t have to grade everything. Have a bi-weekly binder check, check the occasional assignment for completion as long as you’re fully assessing in other areas or other times. Sometimes, teaching responsibility of completing work on time can BE the lesson and you will check them for comprehension or application on another assessment.

Grading is first and foremost about feedback. If the learning opportunity is not going to provide feedback for your students to improve, then manage and consolidate how much time you spend on it. Prioritize the learning opportunities over the numerical values. On a practical note, you will have to carve out a section of your day or after school to grade or enter scores into the gradebook. Pick an hour or two every day to get some work done and then leave it for the next day; grading will always be there tomorrow. I hope that helps. 

mdmshakespeare: teachforhistory: mrskcreads:…

mdmshakespeare:

teachforhistory:

mrskcreads:

teacherbychance:

maevegreen:

tormentedpenguin86:

11

6

Um, I never had braces… 

17…😅😂😇

13

14

4. Woot! Imma badass 😂

9.

edukaition: teressabee:I love her so much I u…

edukaition:

teressabee:

I love her so much

I ugly cry every time I see this clip, watch this gif set, even when I was reading about her in a “best TV episodes of the century” ranking list a few weeks ago. 

Regular

I’m not ready to go back to work tomorrow.

Welcome to Room 207. Year 4 starts next week. …

Welcome to Room 207. Year 4 starts next week.

I need a nicer way to display the ladder for yearbook, but I haven’t decided what it is yet.

I would like to follow more fitblrs, teachers,…

mdmshakespeare:

mcpeaceteach:

hrroyalgeekness:

thecaffeinatedteacher:

the-dressage-draft:

bohemianrandomnity:

rebel-teacher:

bestdayofmylife:

mrskaaay:

andimtheteacher:

wincherella:

spaghettimaestra:

beckieteaches:

elviajedelaesperanza:

pig-whale:

nutrivincik:

Please like or reblog so I can follow you.

Hi! 28, teacher, love my cat, sometimes post pretty pictures from beach runs or hikes. Genuinely nice person most days.

oh hey that’s me. minus the cats. I just like the cats that appear on my dash.

26. Teacher. No cats, but ferrets are close, right?

Just shy of 30 and allergic to cats. Nice most days and prefers to reblog with a side of sass thrown in~

Well over the age of 25, have 3 cats, teacher for 15 years, try to be fit, and am generally considered nice. 

Sign me up; I qualify! 🙂

27, no cats and pathetically out of shape, but I try to be a nice person!

me me! 28, teacher, cat lover, pretty nice most of the time i think : )

30, 8 years in teaching, love most animals.

27, ex-teacher (taught for 5 years), I have two cats, I don’t work out much but I do theatre and stress out, so that works? lol

28, former music teacher/current aspiring librarian, two cats, and always ready to chat with nice people!

36 English teacher, one cat (who I am dreadfully allergic to and his name is Gary…) and I try to be nice… also working on health and fitness…

30, teacher, severely allergic to cats, but I have cute fun parrots. Try to be nice, and working on the health and fitness thing. Kinda out of shape right now.

I can be nice. I taught for 17 years and have 2 cats, one fat and one young. I am now a teacher on assignment.

Forty, three cats, 18 years teaching, love to run when I can (although slowly)

Almost 30, allergic to cats, 4 years teaching full time, and working hard on getting into shape.

save-me-grunkle-ford: roseynopes: stylemic: …

save-me-grunkle-ford:

roseynopes:

stylemic:

What it’s like to be slut-shamed when buying birth control

Even when pharmacists do let people access contraception, whether emergency contraception or condoms or prescription birth control pills, the process isn’t always free of judgment. In a series of recent online discussions, people across the country have begun to share stories of the stigma they’ve experienced. As many have pointed out, this can be especially damaging to teens.

DO YOU SEE THIS? PHARMACY EMPLOYEES IN THE U.S. ARE NOT LEGALLY ALLOWED TO DO THIS. THAT GOES FOR THE PEOPLE AT THE FRONT AS WELL AS PEOPLE IN WHITE COATS BEHIND THE CAGE.

If an employee in a pharmacy makes a snide comment – Front store workers, pharmacists, or Pharmacy Techs give you shit? Gently (Or not so gently) remind them that the waiver they signed upon being hired legally binds them from commenting on your purchase, as it is a violation of privacy laws. Doing so is grounds for INSTANT termination and hefty fines.

Pharmacy workers (white coats) are legally obligated to ASK if you need an explanation of how medication works and any side effects, any medication conflicts etc. If you decline, THEY ARE NOT ALLOWED AT ALL TO MAKE SNIDE REMARKS OR FARTHER COMMENT ON YOUR PURCHASE. FRONT STORE EMPLOYEES CAN NOT AT ALL COMMENT IN ANY WAY, IN ANY STORE WITH A PHARMACY IN IT.

Know your rights. If this shit happens? Call them the fuck out and ask to speak to a manager. Get worked up. Cause a scene. Threaten a Lawsuit. If you see this happening to someone else, and they seem to be struggling, speak up for them. 

As a Pharmacy worker, you bet your ass I’ll protect you and your privacy. IT’S MY JOB.

REBLOG THIS

I DONT CARE WHAT YOUR BLOG IS

THIS IS SOMETHING EVERYONE SHOULD SEE

Do you have any advice for a newish (2 years s…

Do you have any advice for a newish (2 years since graduating) teacher that has only had parental leaves as experience, in finding a (suburban Chicago) job? I find it so hard not to get bogged down, but being asked about experience/ asked for proof of work (including lesson plans- wtf) in applications makes me feel horrible about myself and my skills. Any advice/ encouragement?

Hey Anon,

The job of finding a teacher position can be tough. 

The feeling I’m getting from this ask if that your interviewers aren’t respecting your time in the classroom, writing you off as “only a maternity leave sub.” Like they say on Mad Men, if you don’t like what they’re saying about you, change the conversation. Focus on the results you got from those students, or how little you were given to work with. Show just how much lipstick you had to put on each of those damn pigs. 

However, that means you’ll need that information to change the conversation. Test scores or a drop in suspensions or an uptick in attendance, anything that can prove having YOU there was better than having any warm body in that room. You don’t need to feel horrible, what they are asking for is standard for any teacher looking for a job, but don’t let them demean your experience. If they “neg” you, you bolster yourself, or you leave the interview. I’ve only ever gotten up and walked out mid-interview once, but I have never regretted it. 

As for suburban Chicago. There’s Chicago, and then there’s the ‘burbs, and unfortunately they are entirely different animals. I have no help for you on that front. My only thought is that it’s going to be a bit harder at this point because most of the suburban schools have started already, if I believe. 

Good luck, reach out if you need!

-WCT