Day One Hundred Seventy-Two

Today was incredible.

It was the final day of APUSGOV. We ate donuts and watched The West Wing (”The Stackhouse Filibuster” because I love a filibuster, and the episode’s ending fit the occasion: “Tonight I’ve seen a man with no legs stay standing, and a guy with no voice keep shouting. And if politics brings out the worst in people, maybe people bring out the best.”). And then I delivered my last lesson. I told them this was their time, I thanked them for the amazing journey they took me on this year, and then I gave them the farewell letter I wrote.

I won’t share its full contents, but I will share a bit. I’m fond of quoting poetry, and this class was fond of hearing it, so I left them with a snippet from Mary Oliver:

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?“

I didn’t cry, but it was a near thing. 

I got to see most of my students again during Block 5 because we had one last congressional candidate in as guest speaker. This one’s the democratic frontrunner, and I’d bugged his campaign SO MUCH about scheduling a visit that I was actually super nervous. Like, if it didn’t go well after I was a total pain in the neck? Oh man… 

My World students made fun of me for my nerves in between drafting and conferencing, which… Okay. 

I didn’t need to be nervous, of course. It went so well. It may have actually been the best meeting with a candidate we had. I know I sound like a broken record at this point when I say my students asked such good questions, but they did. One of the underclassmen who’s been joining us even came with prepared notes. I am so proud of her! 

The Vice Principal caught up with me after the bell to ask how it had gone, and to congratulate me on getting so many guests in. I still can’t believe that we did! The lesson is that it never hurts to ask. I have engaged, inspirational students; folks in politics should want to meet them.